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Just last year in the United States, deaf protestors marched on Washington D. to demand access to work, holding a banner that read "75% of Deaf are not working in USA." What these numbers and actions suggest is that while companies are proudly touting diversity initiatives and proclaiming themselves to be "equal opportunity employers," the reality does not match the narrative.

Often, discrimination against deaf individuals begins right in the interview stage.

While it might seem obvious that companies should provide interpreters for interviewees, as legally required, the unfortunate reality is that this makes deaf job candidates seem like a "burden" right off the bat.

Hicks and Kristina Escamilla Gilmore Diversity in the workplace benefits employees, employers and society as a whole.

In reality, while there are individuals who are fully deaf and fully blind, many people who are deaf-blind have some usable vision and hearing. The EEOC says Fed Ex Ground employed a significant number of deaf package handlers nationwide but failed to provide needed accommodations.The lawsuit arose from 19 discrimination charges filed nationwide.Often, employers do not understand how to accommodate people with different abilities, fearing (incorrectly) that it will be costly or complicated.More importantly, they do not understand the value that people who are deaf bring to the team.Today, employers recognize the value of a diverse workforce and have made significant strides in recruiting and retaining employees with a variety of personalities, backgrounds and experiences.

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